Poutine Review: Paul Patates (and Spruce Beer)

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Some people refer to this classic 1950s diner as “poutine heaven,” and it frequently comes up in discussions about the best poutine in Montreal. It sits in an off-the-beaten-track corner of the working-class neighbourhood of Pointe Saint-Charles. I made the trek out here a few times but it was always closed, being one of those rare casse-croutes that shutters up at 7PM.

Paul Patates is also famous for its starring tole in Quebec TV show Taxi 0-22, which I have never seen given that I don’t own a television.

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Poutine Review: Le Boucan

Le Boucan

Southern food isn’t my favourite, but this place in Little Burgundy does it right, and such comfort food is a beautiful thing on a cold snowy day. I love this place. Their bourbon cocktails are delicious. Their pulled pork sandwiches are delicious. Their mac & cheese is delicious. Their buttermilk pie is delicious.

Le Boucan
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Poutine Review: Comptoir 21

Comptoir 21 - Poutine

Located in Mile End, Comptoir 21 is best known for fish & chips, which I am told are very good. But here’s a lesser known fact: they may serve up the best poutine in Montreal.

This is a small charmingly rickety snack bar with most table space being an old-school curved lunch counter with revolving seats. It is located on the hipster strip of Saint Viateur and was well-packed with guys in lumberjack shirts sporting perfectly manicured beards and their blasé iphone-toting twentysomething girlfriends with oversized glasses, ugly ironic sweaters and designer rubber boots.

Comptoir 21 - Poutine
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Poutine Review: BARRY

Barry

Bedford is a small nondescript town 15km north of the Vermont border. Though founded by British Loyalists, it is now over 75% francophone. Its biggest claim to fame: Quebec disco-funk legend Boule Noire.

The town’s snack bar is called BARRY. Not Casse-croute Barry or Restaurant Barry, just BARRY, in ALL CAPS, like this:

Barry

…and THIS:

Barry
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Poutine Review: Mâche

Mâche

Mâche, an attractive new restaurant on Montreal’s tacky Latin Quarter strip, specializes in Quebecois comfort food. It’s surprisingly hard to find restaurants that serve paté chinois, ragout de pattes and pouding chomeur in Montreal, so this is a welcome addition to the area. The interior decoration is simple yet effective.

Mâche

Mâche

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Review: Louis’ Luncheonette in Sherbrooke

Louis' Luncheonette

Sherbrooke (pop. 201,890) may be the fourth largest metropolitan area in Quebec, but don’t get your hopes up. You drive through some of the ugliest sprawl in Quebec (King street) to get downtown, and there isn’t much going on when you get there. The two universities in Sherbrooke should give the city a youthful vibe, but the campuses are out in the boonies and, judging by the tumbleweeds and boarded-up facades downtown, students don’t spend much time outside their dorm rooms. Because it was settled by Brits and Loyalists, people hype up Sherbrooke as a slice of New England in Quebec, which is true if you’re thinking of a grim post-industrial New England milltown (i.e. Manchester, NH; Lowell, MA) rather than a vibrant and quaint New England college town you might actually want to visit (i.e. Burlington, VT; Northampton, MA). Last but not least, Sherbrooke has the unfortunate distinction of being the hometown of Jean Charest.

But Sherbrooke isn’t all bad. There are a few nice buildings around and a handful of interesting shops and restaurants in the dreary downtown. The city is more ethno-linguistically diverse than most other cities in the province. And it’s right on the edge of Quebec’s poutine heartland, giving it access to lots of good squeaky cheese suppliers. In the words of a friend who was exiled here for a few years: “It’s boring as hell, but they make damn good poutine.”
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Review: Camion au Pied de Cochon (Food Truck)

Pied de cochon poutine

Although poutine was once regarded as a national embarrassment, Martin Picard is famous for giving the dish its “lettres de noblesse” over a decade ago. He reinvented the cholesterol-heavy dish by adding a chunk of fancy foie-gras, making it even unhealthier. This had the added effect of simultaneously blurring the lines between high and low food culture. Kudos to Picard. It was a clever reinvention.

Unfortunately, this led to an increasingly tiresome wave of copycat chefs reinventing poutine by slapping some additional novelty ingredient on top – everything from duck confit, to roast beef & stilton, to Vietnamese bahn-mi toppings. Many of these designer poutines would not taste very good if you reduced them to the three base ingredients – they rarely use squeaky-fresh cheese, for instance – but adding that slab of foofiness distracts us from the poorly-executed base. I don’t like the idea that you can only elevate poutine by adding some expensive bling to it. Bling is easy – although this added chunk of fatty foie gras felt clever a decade ago, it is looking increasingly bling these days.

I think it’s time to go back to basics. The real chef’s challenge is getting that base perfectly right: making sure the fries have enough crisp and taste, sourcing a place that will provide big chunks of day-fresh squeaky cheese instead of the usual crumbly industrial foodservice distributor crap served up in Montreal restaurants (hint: go to the Bois-Francs), and whipping up the perfect home-made gravy with drippings to make those other ingredients shine. I have tasted many celebrity-chef poutines and have yet to see a chef get those three things right.

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